Earlier this month, Google announced plans to compete with Apple’s AirPort wireless routers with their own Wi-Fi router, OnHub. Now the company has released its companion app for OnHub for the IPHONE and IPAD, called Google On. It allows owners of the router to quickly set it up, control and improve their network connection and more. Here are the features for Google On: Set up your OnHub in just a few minutes Learn how to improve your Wi-Fi connection if there’s a slowdown Run a network check to test your connection speed Easily share your network name and password to friends & family Make changes to your settings, such as your network name or password Remotely provide or receive help from friends and family The Google Store has a listing for the OnHub router for $199.99, but it is currently shown as being out of stock. Other retail stores are expected to start selling the router soon. Check out OnHub from the Google Store ($199.99) Free – Download now Thanks to Tony for the tip!

Source: The IPhone Blog

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Android Wear gets official support for the iPhone

Posted by phil under The IPhone Blog on Lundi août 31, 2015

Google has announced that Android Wear, its software for smartwatches, now works with the IPHONE. The software allows you to get your notifications at a glance, track workouts and fitness goals, and custom reminders. From Google: Get your info at a glance: Check important info like phone calls, messages, and notifications from your favorite apps. Android Wear features always-on displays, so you’ll never have to move your wrist to wake up your watch. Follow your fitness: Set fitness goals, and get daily and weekly views of your progress. Your watch automatically tracks walking and running, and even measures your heart rate. Save time with smart help: Receive timely tips like when to leave for appointments, current traffic info, and flight status. Just say \ »Ok Google\ » to ask questions like \ »Is it going to rain in London tomorrow?\ » or create to-dos with \ »Remind me to pack an umbrella.\ » Currently, Android Wear on the IPHONE is only supported by the LG Watch Urbane, but it will also be supported by all subsequent Android Wear watches. Additionally, you’ll need an IPHONE 5, 5c, 5s, 6, or 6 Plus in order to use your Android Wear smartwatch with your IPHONE. You’ll also need to have iOS 8.2 or later. Free – Download Now Source: Google

Source: The IPhone Blog

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iMore survey shows ultra-high levels of Apple Watch usage

Posted by phil under The IPhone Blog on Lundi août 31, 2015

93% use the Apple Watch five or more days a week, 95% for eight or more hours a day. There’s been a lot of debate over how well the Apple Watch is selling. That’s to be expected. Apple not only launched a new product category but the category itself is still new. Even with hard numbers, there would be very little in the way of context to understand what they mean and that won’t change for a year or more. That’s why, for iMore’s inaugural Apple Watch survey, we chose to focus on something else entirely—not how the Apple Watch is doing but what we’re all are doing with it. For two weeks in July we collected answers using Survey Monkey and over 8000 of you were kind enough to respond. Here’s what you told us. Who’s using the Apple Watch? We asked some basic demographic information to get started. 11% identified as female, which is far less than the 36% that make up iMore’s U.S. audience, according to Quantcast. 70% came from the U.S., which is more than the 50% Quantcast measures. So this survey skewed more towards males in the U.S. than our typical readership. 31% said they were in their 30s, compared to 22% in their 40s, 20% in their 20s, 12% in their 50s, 9% over 60, and 6% under the age of 20. The scale we used for age doesn’t match the one Quantcast uses so a direct comparison there isn’t possible. We’ll correct that in a future survey. Which Apple Watches are people using? The Apple Watch was announced in September of 2014, shown off again in March of 2015, and shipped in April of 2015. Quantities were limited from the outset and some models, including the space black stainless steel and pink sport, took much longer to ship then others. That said, 30% of our readers received their Apple Watch in June. 27% received it in April, 22% in May, and 20% in July. The vast majority of our readers, 80% in all, got 42 mm models. 20% got 38mm. 48% got space gray aluminum. 26% got polished stainless steel. 20% got silver aluminum. 4% got space black. Below 1% got yellow gold. Below 1% got rose gold. While every Apple Watch came with a band, additional bands could also be bought separately. As with the Watches, some bands were more highly constrained than others. Modern buckles, for example, became available for individual purchase in August, after our survey ended. Space black link bracelets and Edition bands have not been made available for separate purchase. 88% own a sport band. 13% own a Milanese loop. 10% own a leather loop. 6% own a link bracelet. 6% own a classic buckle. 2% own a modern buckle accounted. Apple made Watch bands easy to switch. 16% said they change the watch bands occasionally. 11% change weekly and 8%, daily. AppleCare was purchased by just over 40%. How much do people use the Apple Watch? The reason we didn’t run a popularity or satisfaction survey is because iMore is frequented by Apple customers and people invested in the Apple ecosystem. Given that, a usage survey seemed ideally suited to our readership. Still, based on some of the media coverage, we weren’t sure what kind of numbers we’d get. It turns out, we got high ones. 93% of those who took the iMore survey wear the Apple Watch 5 or more days a week. 95% wear their Apple Watch for 8 hours or more a day and 79% wear it for 12 hours or more a day. Next we asked which features are most important to our readers. 98% say notifications are the most important. 84% say timekeeping. 77% say health and fitness. 72% say communications. 44% say Apple Pay and Passbook. 42% say information lookup (calendar, maps, stocks, weather, etc.). 23% say remote control or home automation. Since usage doesn’t exist in a vacuum we did want to ask how well the major features were working for our readers. Reliability may be only one factor that determines usability, but it’s an important one. 98% found notifications to be reliable. 90% found Move tracking to be reliable. 86% found Siri to be reliable. 84% found Exercise tracking to be reliable. 84% found Stand tracking to be reliable. 79% found Workout tracking to be reliable. 72% found app loading/updating to be reliable. 60% found Apple Pay to be reliable. App performance is currently constrained by the Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connection that has to transfer processing and other logic between IPHONE and Apple Watch. For Apple Pay, I wish that we’d broken out where reliability issues were occurring, on-device or with the NFC terminals at retail. Likewise, what issues were being experienced in Workouts. The Apple Watch includes a new interface paradigms in the digital crown and Force Touch, but also skews more towards Siri for voice control and dictation for text input than any previous Apple product. We were curious how that worked out in the real world. 99% use the Digital Crown, 82% use it daily, and 68% use it several times a day or more. 99% use Force Touch, 78% use it daily, and 31% use it several times a day or more. 95% use Siri, 50% use it daily, and 31% who use it several times a day or more. 88% use Dictation, 42% use it daily, and 26% use it several times a day or more. The Digital Crown is primarily used to return to the clock face or home screen, to scroll through options, sometimes to zoom, and sometimes to commit changes. Force Touch is used to bring up contextual menus of important but non-critical options. Siri is used to retrieve information and perform actions. Dictation is used for speech-to-text. Some of those are frequent and routine tasks. Others depend more on the context of use. I wish we’d asked how the navigation methods were being used—digital crown for returning to clock face vs. scrolling lists—so we could gain greater insight. We’ll strive to include that in a future survey. How do people keep time on the Apple Watch? The Apple Watch isn’t a watch the same way the IPHONE is a phone. On the IPHONE, the phone is just an app. On the Apple Watch, timekeeping is almost its own interface mode. That’s an indicator of how important Apple thinks it is and what sort of primacy it requires on the wrist. So, we wanted to find out not just how our readers kept time but how they customized their time-keeping. Almost 37% change their clock face weekly. 18% change monthly, and 13% change daily. 56% use the Modular clock face at least occasionally. 55%use the Utility clock face. 21% use the Simple clock face. 19% use the Chronograph clock face. 18% use the Mickey Mouse clock face. 18% use the Color clock face. 13% use the Solar clock face. 12% use the Astronomy clock face. 10% use the Motion clock face. 7% use the X-Large clock face. X-Large is also used for accessibility so it has importance beyond the raw number. Most clock faces allow for complications and a few allow for several complications. Over 19% change their clock faces and/or complications either for weekends or for school, and 12% either for workouts or when at home. 81% use date. 78% use weather. 71% use activity. 60% use calendar. 54%, use battery. 18% use sunset/sunrise. 12% use moon-phase. 6% use stocks. The Apple Watch also includes several other time keeping features. On iOS, they’re all bundled together in the Clock app. On the Apple Watch, there are distinct Alarm, Timer, Stop Watch, and World clock apps. 80% use the Alarm app, 40% daily or more. 18% use the Alarm complication. 88% use the Timer, 27% daily or more. 22% use the Timer complication. 65% use the Stop Watch, 8% daily or more. 10% use the Stop Watch complication. 57% use the World Clock, 14% daily or more. 16% use the World Clock complication. 45% use the World Clock glance. How do people stay connected with the Apple Watch? Dick Tracy, James Bond, Michael Knight, and countless other sci-fi characters have made many of us long for the ability to use our watches as a communicator. That’s why it’s no surprise so many of us do. Likewise Messages. Mail was more interesting because the current version of watch OS makes it read-only. (Sending mail is coming with watch OS 2 this fall.) Sketches, Taps, and Heartbeats only work with another Apple Watch owner, so with that in mind at least occasional usage still seems high. 91% take and make phone calls, 36% daily or more. 99% send and receive Messages, 84% daily or more. 86% read Mail, 59% daily or more. 51% send and receive Sketches, 10% daily or more. 58% send and receive Taps, 19% daily or more. 55% send and receive Heartbeats, 17% daily or more. We didn’t break out sending and receiving—how many people use the Apple Watch to handle incoming communications versus how many initiate communications. That’s something I hope we can ask about in the future. How do people keep informed with the Apple Watch? The original PDAs were literally personal digital assistants meant to help with information management—namely our contacts, calendars, and the like. The IPHONE added internet information to the mix, with widget-like apps to keep track of weather, stocks, and more. The Apple Watch carriers on many of these functions. Unlike the IPHONE, however, the Apple Watch doesn’t have a web browser or web rendering capabilities. That makes it dependent on apps as a front end for web data. 97% check the weather, 74% daily or more. 89% check Maps, 19% daily or more. 94% check theirs calendars, 64% daily or more. 41% check stocks, 15% daily or more. How do people stay healthy and fit with their Apple Watches? Quantified life in general and fitness trackers in particular have gained attention over recent years. Passive accountability has always been a strong motivator for some, but with the Apple Watch that accountability has also become active. We were curious how, if at all, this helped people change their behaviors. For the Stand alert, we wanted to know if people used it, if they turned it off, or if they left it on but simply ignored it. (Like gym memberships, sometimes having is easier than using.) 25% stand up every time they get an alert. 46% stand up most of the time. 15% stand up some of the time or less. 14% turn them off. 1% leave them on but ignore them. Getting 86% of people up and moving around, even some of the time, is terrific. Getting 71% up most of the time is beyond terrific. The Apple Watch also tries to get owners to hit 30 minutes of brisk exercise a day. While the time doesn’t change, getting your heart rate up and keeping it up for those 30 minutes is what counts. 38% achieve their exercise goal 5-7 days a week. 26% achieve it 3-4 days a week. 16% achieve it 1-2 days a week. 12% don’t use it. 88% of people at least keeping aware of their activity is likewise heartening. 64% achieving their goal more than 3 times a week is inspiring. Move goals, which counts calories burned, can be set and adjusted over time. Here the goal isn’t to do strenuous exercise but just to keep moving. 52% achieve their move goal 5-7 days a week. 28% achieve it 3-4 days a week. 8% achieve it 1-2 days a week. 12% don’t use it. That’s over 88% who monitor the move ring, and over 80% who achieve their calorie burning goals at least 3 days a week. I do wish we’d asked about general fitness levels and behavior as well, to try and get a better idea of what kind of changes, if any, took place with Apple Watch usage, but every survey is a balance of how much you can ask before people stop answering. For the Workout app, we simply asked what types of workouts people were using. Since the Workout app has an \ »Other\ » category, we included it. 64% track outdoor walks 32% track outdoor runs. 38% track \ »other\ » workouts. 25% track indoor walks. 16% track indoor runs. 15 % track elliptical. 7% track stairs. 5% track rowing. 14% don’t use it. I hope we can explore \ »other\ » in more detail in the future to find out what kinds of workouts are being tracked that the Apple Watch doesn’t already break out. How do people use Passbook and Apple Pay on the Apple Watch? Passbook, which will change names to Wallet as part of watchOS 2 this fall, collects together cards, tickets, and other passes, as well as credit and debit cards as part of Apple Pay. We wanted to know how our readers were using it. 48% use Passbook to pay for purchases at stores like Starbucks. 28% use it for boarding passes at airports and other travel stations. 22% for ticketing at movie theaters or other events. 36% don’t use it. Unlike Passbook, which can be used everywhere, Apple Pay has only been available in the U.S. since last October and in the U.K. since June. Availability also depends on the card issuer and the point of purchase. That made it tougher to ask about usage numbers. 32% use Apple Pay always, if available. 12% use it frequently, if available. 18% use it occasionally, if available. 12% don’t use it, even if available. 21% can’t use it because it’s not available to them. All told, that’s 62% using Apple Pay at least occasionally or more on their Apple Watch. How do people use notifications on the Apple Watch? Convenience has often been cited as one of the primary reasons to use an Apple Watch, and notifications as one of the primary conveniences. We weren’t just curious about whether or not our readers use notifications, because we suspected they do in droves, but how they set up their notifications. Apple Watch allows for sound, haptic \ »taps\ », both, or neither. 99% use Messages alerts, 49% with sound and haptics, 2% just sound, 48% just haptics. 93% use Reminders alerts, 44% with sound and haptics, 3% just sound, 46% just haptics. 93% use Activity alerts, 44% with sounds and haptics, 2% ust sound, 48% just haptics. 91% use Calendar alerts, 41% with sound and haptics, 3% just sound, and 47% just haptics. 77% use Mail alerts, 35% with sound and haptics, 3% just sound, 40% just haptics. We didn’t ask, but it’d be interesting to see how many people leave on sound to make absolutely sure they don’t miss an alert and how many go haptics-only to make notifications less obtrusive. Also, there’s no built-in Reminders app on Apple Watch as there is on iOS and OS X, so notifications is the only way to stay on top of them unless and until your install an App Store app. How do people use glances on the Apple Watch? Notifications are bits of data that appear briefly, on top of any screen, to alert you to some bit of presumably important information. Glances are bits of data that persist in a defined space, waiting for you to seek them out. Where notifications are push, glances are pull. That made for an interesting comparison. Glances can also be uninstalled, so we asked about that as well. 86% use the Activity glance , 63% daily or more. 7% don’t use it, 7% uninstalled it. 86% use the Heartbeat glance, 36% daily or more. 9% don’t use it, 4% uninstalled it. 85% use the Weather glance, 58% daily or more. 6% don’t use it, 9% uninstalled it. 85% use the Battery glance, 48% daily or more. 10% don’t use it, 5% uninstalled it. 82% use the Now Playing glance, 44%daily or more. 13% don’t use it, 5% uninstalled it. 45% use the World Clock glance, 11.35% daily or more. 26% don’t use it, 29% uninstalled it. 82% use the Calendar glance, 50% daily or more. 8% don’t use it, 10% uninstalled it. 36% use the Stocks glance, 14% daily or more. 29% don’t use it, 36% uninstalled it. 35% use the Maps glance, 11% daily or more. 15% don’t use it, 20% uninstalled it. We didn’t ask about App Store glances in this survey but will in the future. How do people use apps on the Apple Watch? Apple Watch apps are currently extensions that have their interface on the Watch but their logic on the IPHONE. Native apps will be coming with watchOS 2 this fall, but for now all processing needs to be done on the IPHONE. That makes Apple Watch apps slower to load and prevents most functionality from working when disconnected from the IPHONE. Limited as they are, that didn’t stop almost all Apple Watch owners from using them, and a majority from having under ten installed. 29% have 6-10 apps installed. 26% have 11-20 apps installed. 23% have 1-5 apps installed. 15% have 20 or more. That means 94% of readers have App Store apps installed, 71% have more than 5 installed, and 42% have more than 10 installed. As developers get better at making apps specifically for the watch, and the apps themselves get better with watchOS 2 and subsequent versions, it’ll be interesting to see how those numbers change. When it comes to the type of apps being used usage varied. Since many types of apps fall into multiple categories, there’s likely to be significant overlap. I wish we’d asked about occupations so we could provide better context around usage here as well. Business apps, for example, may not be used as much by the general population, but they’re likely to be incredibly important to those in business. 74% use health and fitness apps with 34% using them daily or more. 24% don’t use them. 72% use utilities with 19% using them daily or more. 25% don’t use them. 69% use productivity apps with 26% using them daily or more. 27% don’t use them. 66% use social networking apps with 25% using them daily or more. 31% don’t use them. 63% use news apps with 24% using them daily or more. 34% don’t use them. 60% use lifestyle apps with 14% using them daily or more. 38% don’t use them. 46% use business apps with 13% using them daily or more. 50% don’t use them. 40% use finance apps with 40% with 9% using them daily or more. 56% don’t use them. 47% use food and drink apps with 7% using them daily. 49% don’t use them. 56% use travel apps with 6% using them daily or more. 39% don’t use them. 31% play games with 5% playing them daily or more. 65% don’t play them. Which apps are people using on the Apple Watch? Instead of asking which five apps our readers had installed on their Apple Watches, we asked which were their favorite or most-used apps. The idea was to try to get to the apps that really resonated on the wrist. 10.79% Dark Sky 8.34% Overcast 8.28% Twitter 7.11% 1Password 7.09% Fantastical 6.49% Instagram 6.20% Shazam 4.41% Starbucks 3.47% Uber 3.41% MLB at Bat 3.33% Weather 3.22% ESPN 3.22% Philips Hue 3.20% Evernote 3.08% Calcbot 3.06% Omnifocus 2.60% Yelp 2.54% Nike+ Running 2.50% Deliveries 2.45% Runkeeper 2.43% MyFitnessPal 2.37% CNN 2.27% Clear 2.14% Mail 2.06% Swarm 2.02% New York Times 1.81% Wunderlist 1.77% Things 1.77% Workout 1.75% PCalc 1.68% Yahoo Weather 1.60% Strava 1.58% The Weather Channel 1.56% Weather Underground 1.54% BBC News 1.50% Spark 1.46% Ebay 1.46% Slack 1.31% Citymapper 1.27% Amazon 1.23% Authy 1.23% Due 1.10% Flipboard 1.04% Pandora 0.94% Twitterrific 0.92% MacID 0.92% Microsoft Outlook 0.92% Todoist 0.89% Timer 0.89% Withings Which apps, not already on the Apple Watch, are people waiting for? We also asked which five apps that aren’t currently available for Apple Watch our readers are most looking forward to. 21.48% Facebook 9.50% Tweetbot 9.15% Whatsapp 7.48% Facebook Messenger 6.17% Nest 5.48% Reminders 4.89% Snapchat 4.62% Google Maps 4.62% Spotify 3.84% Notes 3.37% Find My Friends 3.37% Waze 2.86% Sonos 2.80% Podcasts 2.03% Youtube 1.85% Imore 1.82% Audible 1.79% Google Hangouts 1.67% Chase Bank 1.64% Microsoft Outlook 1.49% Fitbit 1.31% Downcast 1.28% Reeder 1.28% Wemo 1.25% Apple News 1.22% Gmail 1.19% Calculator 1.19% Find My IPHONE 1.19% Google Search 1.13% Mailbox 1.13% Voice Memos 1.07% Bank Of America 1.01% Inbox By Gmail 0.95% Google Authenticator 0.92% Netflix 0.89% Wells Fargo 0.86% Anylist 0.86% Apple Music 0.83% Google Translate 0.83% Harmony Remote 0.83% Linkedin 0.80% Facetime 0.77% Safari 0.77% Xbox One Smartglass 0.71% Pocket Casts 0.69% Plex 0.69% Pocket 0.69% Vine 0.69% Weather Line State of the Apple Watch I expected high numbers for general usage on the Apple Watch but the numbers we saw, especially how much people are wearing it daily and hourly, were even higher than I expected. Notification, communication, and health and fitness are often cited as principle reasons people use their Apple Watch. The motivational aspects of the health and fitness apps, however, were impressive. We need to dig deeper into those and find out how much change affect it’s having. Some areas proved harder to measure than we anticipated. Areas like stocks reported low usage but that doesn’t give a sense of how many people who consider Stocks important use them on Apple Watch. That’s true of every category, but the smaller the niche, the more important it feels. That’s especially true with apps as well. Likewise Apple Pay, given it’s a feature not everyone can yet be used by everyone or everywhere. Getting more granular there would help break that out better. Going forward watchOS 2 will offer substantial new functionality, including App Store complications, Time Travel, and most importantly, native apps. That could change several areas of usage so we’ll run the survey again next quarter and see what’s developed. Thanks to everyone who took part. We very much look forward to continuing to share even more insight in the near future! Read our Apple Watch review Visit our Apple Watch hub */

Source: The IPhone Blog

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SmartHalo guide à vélo, grâce à l’iPhone

Posted by phil under IPhon on Lundi août 31, 2015

On l’a vu dans ce dossier vélo, une flopée d’accessoires sont déjà disponible pour les technophiles désireux d’emmener leur smartphone sur la bicyclette. Certains permettent de fixer l’IPHONE sur le guidon, d’autres de compter les kilomètres ou encore de recharger le téléphone en roulant, etc. L’entreprise CycleLabs propose quant à elle un système de guidage multifonction et ergonomique déporté sur le guidon, le SmartHalo. Le rôle principal du SmartHalo est de permettre une navigation simplifiée. Synchronisé avec l’IPHONE via l’application companion, le SmartHalo indique le chemin par des halos lumineux verts, blancs et rouges, jusqu’à la destination désirée. Les LEDs s’illuminent en vert et blanc à droite ou à gauche pour indiquer un tournant à effectuer à droite ou à gauche, ou en rouge pour signaler une mauvaise direction. En plus du guidage satellite, le boitier intègre d’autres fonctions utiles. Il est doté d’une puce GPS capable de localiser le vélo sur son IPHONE. Il enregistre aussi automatiquement toutes les données de route, temps, distance, vitesse, calories dépensées, dénivelés, etc. Malheureusement, le SmartHalo ne fait pas les glaçons, mais il sert de lampe-torche la nuit, ainsi que d’antivol! Notons tout de même qu’il soit peu probable que le clignotement de l’appareil en rouge fasse fuir un voleur décidé… Dans la liste des fonctions plus pertinentes, il y a également l’avertissement lumineux des appels entrants et la détection du mauvais temps en approche. Concernant sa batterie rechargeable par USB, elle serait capable de tenir 3 semaines en utilisation standard. Le halo est compatible avec toute forme de guidon, il est possible de se le procurer pour 99$ dans le cadre de la campagne de financement Kickstarter. Son prix remontera à 149$ une fois le projet clôturé. La livraison aux premiers acheteurs est prévue pour mai 2016. Appareil intelligent, ce SmartHalo risque en tous cas de plaire aux amateurs de longues balades en vélo. Ces derniers devraient d’ailleurs jeter un oeil à un projet assez similaire, le Cobi. A lire également : 7 accessoires pour profiter de son IPHONE à vélo Source Suivre l’actualité VIPAD.fr Suivez nous sur Twitter Devenez fan sur Facebook Abonnez vous au fil RSS Vous aimez ? Partagez !

Source: IPhon

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250 000 comptes iCloud volés sur des iPhone et iPad jailbreakés

Posted by phil under IPAD, IPhon on Lundi août 31, 2015

Avec l’App Store, Apple bride ce que les développeurs peuvent proposer aux utilisateurs, c’est parfois regrettable même si peu à peu de plus en plus de possibilités sont ouvertes. A l’inverse cela offre une protection contre les applications malveillantes et autres virus. Protection qui est forcément moindre lorsque la machine est JAILbreakée. La preuve vient malheureusement d’en être apportée une nouvelle fois avec le vol de 250 000 comptes Apple par le malware KeyRaider : Ce sont en fait 92 variantes d’un code destiné à intercepter les communications itunes et à cette occasion récupérer les identifiants et mots de passe qui ont été repérés récemment. Une société spécialisée dans la sécurité a pu analyser ces codes et retrouver les informations de machine et comptes ainsi piratés stockés sur des serveurs. Les logiciels infectés ont été téléchargés via les outils de mise à disposition de tweaks via Cydia, majoritairement depuis des serveurs chinois. Néanmoins, la société de sécurité indique qu’ils ont retrouvé des victimes en provenance de 18 pays, Chine en tête, mais également, France, UK, US, Italie, Canada, etc … Les comptes dérobés servaient ensuite à permettre des achats sur iTunes à grane échelle : ce seraient ainsi 20 000 personnes qui utiliseraient certains des 250 000 comptes piratés pour faire leurs emplettes (applis mais aussi achat in-app) sur iTunes. Dans d’autres cas, des machines ont été bloquées à distance, proposant de les débloquer contre une "rançon". Un article particulièrement complet peut être consulté ici, il indique la technique mise en oeuvre, les tweaks concernés, les potentiels auteurs ou diffuseurs et indique également comment ceux qui ont des doutes peuvent vérifier si ils ont été infectés. Il semblerait d’après les chiffres partagés que l’on soit là en face du pire cas de piratage et de vol de données encore rencontré dans l’univers iOS et JAILbreak. Source Suivez l’actualité iPhon.fr Suivez nous sur Twitter Devenez fan sur Facebook Abonnez vous au fil RSS Vous aimez ? Partagez !

Source: IPhon

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History of iPhone: Apple reinvents the phone

Posted by phil under The IPhone Blog on Lundi août 31, 2015

On the eve of IPHONE 6s, we’re updating and expanding our history of IPHONE series—starting with the one that started it all! On January 9, 2007 Steve Jobs put sneaker to stage to give one of the most incredible keynote presentations of his life—a life filled with incredible keynote presentations—and in the history of consumer electronics. He said he would be introducing a wide-screen iPod with touch controls, a revolutionary mobile phone, and a breakthrough internet device. But it wasn’t three products. It was one product. We got it, Steve. It was the IPHONE. It was rare enough for a company to revolutionize even one product category. Apple had already revolutionized two: Computers with the Mac and personal music players with the iPod. With the IPHONE they’d be going for three. First, he set up and knocked down the physical keyboard and the stylus, features that dominated the BlackBerry, Motorola, and Palm smartphones of the day. Then Jobs introduced the multitouch interface that let the IPHONE smoothly pinch-to-zoom, the physics-based interactivity that included inertial scrolling and rubber banding, and the multitasking that let him move seamlessly from music to call to web to email and back. They were technologies that would one day become commonplace across the industry but back then looked like science-fiction. From Apple: IPHONE is a revolutionary and magical product that is literally five years ahead of any other mobile phone. We are all born with the ultimate pointing device—our fingers—and IPHONE uses them to create the most revolutionary user interface since the mouse. Technology alone wasn’t enough The original IPHONE, based on the P2 device of the Project Experience Purple (PEP) team, code named M68 and device number IPHONE1,1, had a 3.5-inch LCD screen at 320×480 and 163ppi, a quad-band 2G EDGE data radio, 802.11b.g Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.0 EDR, and a 2 megapixel camera. It was powered by an ARM-based 1176JZ(F)-S processor and PowerVR MBX Lite 3D graphics chip, manufactured by Samsung, with an 1400 mAh battery, and had 128MB of on-board RAM. Two NAND Flash-based storage tiers were available at launch: 4GB or 8GB. The IPHONE also included several sensors to enhance the experience, like an accelerometer that could automatically rotate the screen to match device orientation, a proximity sensor that could automatically turn off the screen when close to the face, and an ambient light sensor that could automatically adjust brightness. And it could also be charged—and importantly, synced to iTunes—by the same 30-pin Dock connector as Apple’s already exceedingly popular iPod. What the original IPHONE didn’t have was CDMA and EVDO rev A network compatibly. That meant it couldn’t work on two of the U.S.’ big four carriers, Verizon and Sprint. Not that it mattered; the original IPHONE was exclusive to AT&T. It also lacked GPS, or support for faster 3G UTMS/HSPA data speeds. In addition to no hardware keyboard or stylus, the IPHONE also didn’t have a removable, user-replaceable battery or SD card support. None of that pleased existing power users of the time. Nor did the absence of an exposed file system, copy and paste or any form of advanced text editing, and, critically to many, support for third party apps. Likewise, since the IPHONE had a real web browser instead of a WAP browser, which was required to display carrier-based multimedia messages, the original IPHONE didn’t support MMS either. All of this was wrapped in bead-blasted aluminum with a black plastic band around the back to allow for RF transparency. Then there was the price. The IPHONE debuted at $499 for the 4GB and $599 for the 8GB model on-contract. Those prices weren’t unheard of at the time—early Motorola RAZR flip phones were incredibly expensive as well—but it meant Apple couldn’t penetrate the mainstream market. Race to launch Macworld wasn’t a finish line, it was a shot from the starting pistol. Jony Ive, Richard Howarth, and the industrial design teams’ work had largely been completed already but hardware engineering still faced challenges. Steve Jobs scratched the pre-release IPHONE screen with the keys in his pocket, he asked the team to come up with a better solution. They turned to Corning, which had invented a new, chemically hardened material, but had yet to find a commercial application for it. The team spun on a dime and got Gorilla Glass onto the IPHONE. The software team, under the auspices of Scott Forstall, was still racing as well. Greg Christie, Bas Ording, Mike Matas and others had been working on the human interface and interactivity for a long time already, but things were still being tweaked. Split screen for email, for example, got pulled after Jobs felt it was too crowded on the small screen. Likewise Henri Lamiraux’s software engineering and frameworks team, including Nitin Ganatra’s native apps team, and Richard’ Williamson’s mobile web team. They had to make sure all the apps and all the features performed not only reliably but delightfully. They’d already gotten a relatively full version of Safari, based on the same WebKit rendering engine developed by Don Melton and team for the Mac, up and running and taken Google’s location data and created the best mobile Maps implementation ever seen on mobile, but they ended adding a YouTube app as well. On June 6, 2007 Steve Jobs again took to the stage at Moscone West, this time for Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference. He announced web 2.0 apps as the development platform but also announced something more: the launch date. June 29, 2007 Lineups formed at Apple Stores, especially flagship stores like the glass cube in New York City. It was an event. The novelty and experience were so good, many people simply didn’t care about missing features or high price tags. Walt Mossberg and Katherine Boehret, writing for The Wall Street Journal: Our verdict is that, despite some flaws and feature omissions, the IPHONE is, on balance, a beautiful and breakthrough handheld computer. Its software, especially, sets a new bar for the smart-phone industry, and its clever finger-touch interface, which dispenses with a stylus and most buttons, works well, though it sometimes adds steps to common functions. Ryan Block, writing for Engadget: It’s easy to see the device is extraordinarily simple to use for such a full-featured phone and media player. Apple makes creating the spartan, simplified UI look oh so easy — but we know it’s not, and the devil’s always in the details when it comes to portables. To date no one’s made a phone that does so much with so little, and despite the numerous foibles of the IPHONE‘s gesture-based touchscreen interface, the learning curve is surprisingly low. It’s totally clear that with the IPHONE, Apple raised the bar not only for the cellphone, but for portable media players and multifunction convergence devices in general. The price, however, kept it from getting into as many hands and lives as Apple wanted. So, at the September 5, 2007 \ »The Beat Goes On\ » music event, Steve Jobs not only introduced the first iPod touch, he announced they were dropping the 4GB IPHONE entirely, and dropping the price of the 8GB IPHONE to $399. From Apple: The surveys are in and IPHONE customer satisfaction scores are higher than we’ve ever seen for any Apple product. We’ve clearly got a breakthrough product and we want to make it affordable for even more customers as we enter this holiday season. On February 5, 2008, Greg Joswiack, vice president of Worldwide iPod and IPHONE Product Marketing, announced a 16GB model. From Apple: For some users, there’s never enough memory. Now people can enjoy even more of their music, photos and videos on the most revolutionary mobile phone and best Wi-Fi mobile device in the world. There was still no subsidized price, even on contract, but there was movement. Competitive contempt The vast majority of smartphones back in 2007 had hardware keyboards and, if they touch screens at all, those screens were almost all resistive and came with a stylus pen to aid in usability. Mobile apps were inconsistent and the mobile web was pretty much limited to WAP browsers. While the IPHONE certainly wasn’t universally adored, the entrenched incumbents in the smartphone space were some of its harshest critics. That was, after all, their jobs. Ed Coligan, former CEO of Palm: We’ve learned and struggled for a few years here figuring out how to make a decent phone. PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They’re not going to just walk in. Mike Lazaridis, former CEO of RIM (now BlackBerry): Talk — all I’m [hearing] is talk about [the IPHONE‘s chances in Enterprise]. I think it’s important that we put this thing in perspective. [...] Apple’s design-centric approach [will] ultimately limit its appeal by sacrificing needed enterprise functionality. I think over-focus on one blinds you to the value of the other. [...] Apple’s approach produced devices that inevitably sacrificed advanced features for aesthetics. Steve Ballmer, former CEO of Microsoft: You can get a Motorola Q for $99. [...] [Apple] will have the most expensive phone, by far, in the marketplace. There’s no chance that the IPHONE is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It was a very different world in 2007. Phone were just beginning to hit usable data speeds but bandwidth was still limited and expensive. The appeal of smartphones was also limited primarily to early adopters and enterprise, and hadn’t yet approached mainstream adoption. Palm and BlackBerry were both wrong. Smartphones would give way to pocket computers and \ »PC guys\ »—if they worked for Apple—were absolutely the ones to figure it out. And for consumers, the interface is the feature, so by tackling interface Apple was beginning to make those pocket computers accessible to everyone. Microsoft, however, was at least half right. The IPHONE was too expensive. That was, however, something Apple could and would change. Google, an original IPHONE launch partner, was both more perceptive, and more agile. They’d already bought Danger, the next generation phone platform created by Sidekick mastermind — and former Apple employee — Andy Rubin. They’d originally focused on making a Windows Mobile/BlackBerry-style competitor, determined to make sure Microsoft could never dominate the market and cut them out of the mobile future they so clearly recognized would be the next big thing. Google’s then-CEO, Eric Schmidt was on Apple’s Board of Director’s—and on stage for the IPHONE event. He hadn’t told Rubin what Apple was doing, however, or that Google would be giving the IPHONE Maps and YouTube. Rubin was shocked. Collectively they realized Microsoft might not dominate mobile at all. Apple might. So, much to their credit, they spun around and refocused Android at the IPHONE. One year later Apple discontinued the original IPHONE in June of 2008. By then total sales had reached over 6 million units. And that was on four carriers in four countries. The impact of the IPHONE, however, was felt far beyond those numbers or borders. And it was just beginning… IPHONE 6s IPHONE 6s FAQ IPHONE 6s news IPHONE 6s discussion iOS 9 news */ /*–> */ /*–> */

Source: The IPhone Blog

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This spring clip holster keeps your device clipped in tight, no matter the hustle and bustle. Just snap it to your belt, pants, or bag and pop in your device. The top spring clip is extremely tough and provides quick-release access when you need to answer a call, text or email. Yours today for only $14.95

Source: The IPhone Blog

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Spigen devance l’appel : coques iPhone 6s et rose à l’honneur

Posted by phil under IPhon on Lundi août 31, 2015

Le doute n’est plus de mise, l’IPHONE 6s arrive et sera présenté dans un peu plus d’une semaine, le 9 Septembre à 19h (Heure Française). On sait qu’il va conserver un design très ressemblant à celui de l’IPHONE 6 et 6 Plus actuels. Sauf que des petites différences sont tout de même anticipées. Ainsi, une très légère augmentation de l’épaisseur ainsi que d’éventuels modifications au niveau de la taille de l’objectif photo pourraient rendre les coques IPHONE 6 actuellement commercialisées plus ou moins compatibles. Mais que l’on se rassure, les fabricants sont sur le coup : Ainsi, la marque Spigen n’est pas en retard et vient d’ores et déjà d’anticiper la sortie d’un IPHONE 6s en présentant de nouvelles protections sur son site Internet : Le nouveau coloris "or rose" est mis en valeur. On a évoqué son arrivée encore tout récemment ici. La gamme est particulièrement complète et déjà listée chez Amazon US Alors bien entendu, cela peut être un simple coup marketing : présenter une future gamme très proche de l’actuelle n’engage pas énormément, quitte à produire lorsque les dimensions sont officielles. Néanmoins, à ce stade, les dimensions de l’IPHONE 6 sont à priori déjà connues des fabricants d’accessoires et Spigen avait pour l’IPHONE 6 été l’un des premiers l’an dernier à proposer des protections aux dimensions du tout nouvel IPHONE 6, lors de sa sortie. Sur Amazon.fr, on commence à trouver quelques accessoires IPHONE 6s mais c’est encore très rare. Ce type d’anticipation n’est pas rare et permet d’engranger des ventes records lors de la sortie, lorsque l’offre est peu développée. Cela a d’ailleurs conduit à des erreurs lors de l’arrivée de certains modèle, avec des coques produites en avance et en quantité, sur un modèle d’IPHONE qui n’a finalement jamais vu le jour … La question qu’il faudra examiner rapidement sera la compatibilité des coques et protections actuelles avec l’IPHONE 6s, un sujet déjà examiné dans cette vidéo. Retrouvez les précédentes rumeurs et fuites concernant les nouveautés de l’IPHONE 6s ici dont : Rumeurs IPHONE 6s : la photo comme nouveauté phare, dates de pré-commande et sortie dévoilées ? IPHONE 6s : fonctionnement et utilisation de Force Touch expliqués Rumeurs : gamme IPHONE après le 9 Septembre, les prix et quid de l’IPHONE 6c un emballage IPHONE 6s plus coloré, qui confirme le nom des IPHONE 2015 ? L’IPHONE 6s pourrait intégrer des fonds d’écran photo animés similaires à ceux de l’Apple Watch Focus sur les nouveautés photo et vidéo de l’IPHONE 6s Rumeurs IPHONE 6s : or rose, version 16 Go, etc … Le boitier de l’IPHONE 6s taillé pour mieux résister à la torsion : vidéo Nouvelles photos IPHONE 6s : l’écran Force Touch se confirme IPHONE 6s : grand déballage de pièces détachées Nouvelles photos du boîtier IPHONE 6s Plus : plus robuste et texture légèrement differente Avec l’IPHONE 6s, vitesse doublée en 4G et autonomie accrue Les premières photos de l’IPHONE 6s sont disponibles Rumeur : un autre emprunt de l’IPHONE 6s à l’Apple Watch ? Source Suivez l’actualité iPhon.fr Suivez nous sur Twitter Devenez fan sur Facebook Abonnez vous au fil RSS Vous aimez ? Partagez !

Source: IPhon

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And our #SwitchToiPhone contest winner is…!

Posted by phil under The IPhone Blog on Lundi août 31, 2015

Apple’s not getting out of the phone business any time soon and that means, barring alien invasion or machine uprising, there’ll be new IPHONEs as early as next month. It also means, if you don’t currently own one, there’s never been a better time to #SwitchToIPHONE. And to help make it even easier for you, we decided to run another contest to give one away! We asked you to send a tweet with the hashtag #SwitchToIPHONE, letting us know why you wanted to be chosen as the winner of a $500 U.S. Apple Store gift certificate. There were a ton of responses! It’s time now to see who the lucky winner is! Congratulations @Leolyon99! Your tweet was chosen as the winning entry. Hey @iMore I want to #SwitchToIPHONE So I can give moms her 1st ever IPHONE — Leo99 (@Leolyon99) August 16, 2015 We’ll be in touch soon to get that squared away for you. Thanks for entering everyone! And if you didn’t win, don’t be down! We’ll be doing an even bigger #SwitchToIPHONE give away really, really soon!

Source: The IPhone Blog

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Les montres Android Wear compatibles iPhone : ça se précise ?

Posted by phil under IPhon on Lundi août 31, 2015

Un indice de plus vient de tomber en faveur de la thèse selon laquelle les montres Android se verraient dotées d’une compatibilité avec les dernières versions d’iOS. En fait, il y a quelques jours, Amazon a mis en ligne la fiche produit de la prochaine Huawei Watch. Celle-ci indiquait la compatibilité avec iOS 8.2 dans ses caractéristiques détaillées. Mais attention, l’information est à prendre avec des pincettes puisque la fiche a été retirée, puis remise en ligne, puis rendue finalement indisponible sur le magasin Amazon américain. Entre temps, certaines informations avaient été modifiées, comme les couleurs ou encore le prix, mais la compatibilité iOS 8.2 restait présente. On apprenait déjà en avril dernier par TheVerge, que Google était en plein travail sur une application permettant de rendre toute montre Android compatible avec l’IPHONE. De plus, on sait que la Pebble Time est déjà capable de fonctionner avec l’IPHONE. Il existe même une astuce non officielle permettant de recevoir les notifications de l’IPHONE sur sa montre Android. Le site Android Police précise avoir reçu la confirmation de la part d’une source sûre, que les montres Android vont bel et bien être compatibles avec l’IPHONE sous peu. Le prochain salon de l’IFA qui se tiendra du 4 au 9 septembre à Berlin serait une occasion idéale pour Google de rendre l’annonce publique, ou en tous cas un peu plus tard durant le mois de septembre. Si cela s’avère être le cas, les utilisateurs d’IPHONE ne seraient plus enfermés dans l’écosystème Apple concernant le choix d’une montre, cela pourrait d’ailleurs ouvrir un peu plus le marché des montres intelligentes, et pourquoi pas, inciter Apple à travailler les points faibles de sa Watch afin de ne pas se laisser submerger par la concurrence Google. Avis aux possesseurs d’IPHONE, envisageriez-vous une montre Android plutôt qu’une Apple Watch? Source Suivez l’actualité iPhon.fr Suivez nous sur Twitter Devenez fan sur Facebook Abonnez vous au fil RSS Vous aimez ? Partagez !

Source: IPhon

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